Growing Better Beets

Oh, the reasons to grow beets in your home garden this year!

Oh, the reasons to grow beets in your home garden this year! If you are anything like me, you may have tried growing beets for years, only to end up with a few beet greens and some pathetic gnarled beet roots. With a bit of care, you too can start growing better beets!

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Beets are literally a vegetable for all seasons. Early beet tops can be added to salad greens for a colorful mix. Beet greens are the delicious thinnings from rows of beets. Tender baby beets are harvested after as little as 40 days to allow the others to grow bigger. Steam them and top with butter for a spring supper delight. Then comes the fall crop of plump, flavorful whole beets. A late summer sowing can give you a quick fall harvest of greens. It’s easy to see why beets are so versatile. Beets and greens are packed with nutrients as well as good for digestion.

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Beets seeds in all colors!

Kaleidoscope of Colors

Although red is the typical color for beets, one look at any seed catalog and you will find that they truly do come in a kaleidoscope of colors. Slice them open and you will see rings of beauty before your eyes. Beets come in round and cylindrical shapes. Varieties of red beets include ‘Bull’s Blood’, ‘Detroit’ and ‘Red Ace’. White beets such as ‘Albino’ or ‘Avalanche’ offer a very different look. Golden beets like ‘Touchstone Gold’ or ‘Bolder’ are extremely popular. Or try ‘Chioggia’, a peppermint striped Italian heirloom. I’m growing something totally different this season, ‘3 Root Grex’ from Fedco. An heirloom mix that includes ‘Yellow Intermediate’, ‘Crosby Purple Egyptian’ and ‘Lutz Saladleaf’. Sounds totally exotic and should be interesting to say the least.

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Colorful beets are a joy to look at!

Although all beet greens are good for eating, ‘Early Wonder Tall Top’ leads the way for spring beet greens. Often sold at farm stands early in the year, beet greens are a local old time spring pleasure.

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Beet greens ready for the cooking pot!

When To Plant Beets

Beets are one of those vegetables that can be seeded out very early. Some of our local markets plant under the cover of greenhouses for an extra early crop. Beet seeds can be planted as soon as the ground can be worked. If your garden is dry enough, go ahead and plant. Beet seeds are actually a cluster of seeds in one so you may get more than one plant sprouting from each seed. Give them a spot full of organic matter and they will grow like crazy! Last year my aged bunny manure was the ticket to getting lovely beets!

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Planting out beet seeds.

Bringing in the Beet Harvest

With so many stages of the beet season to enjoy, don’t miss out on any of them. After about 45 days, it may be time to harvest your first beet greens. Carefully harvest a few greens from the rows. Make sure to leave plenty for the baby beet stage. When beets reach 1-2″, pull some for a feast of tender, sweet baby beet roots.

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Gorgeous beet greens!

During the summer in our garden, beets and chard are planted in the same area for an edible ornamental color show. Beets have few if any pests so they make an easy crop for new gardeners.

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Beet leaves are among the prettiest plants in the garden!

Through the summer, allow some beets to grow to full maturity. Given the space, beets can grow to enormous sizes. I like about 3″ but they can grow much bigger.

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Solid, whole beets maturing in the garden.

As fall approaches, harvest beets for immediate use or prepare them for storage.

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Whole beets keep well for winter use.

Storage and Uses

Beets can be stored for most of the winter by removing tops, washing them and storing them in the refrigerator. Start using them up if they seem soft. They do need proper humidity for good storage. Keep an eye on them. For more storage info, go to Beets and Beet Greens. Canning and pickling are also tasty ways to preserve your beet harvest. Once you start growing better beets, you will want to enjoy them most of the year.

Add beets to your menu with borscht soup, beet salad or roasted beets. Beets are a regular feature of my roasted one-pan meals such as Simple Roasted Vegetables. Beets are great just peeled and boiled for a no-fuss addition to any meal. If the skin is tender, try eating the skin. Otherwise, skins peel off easily after cooking.

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Beets are a star player in my sausage vegetable bake!

For a colorful garden this year, choose beets! They may not be everyone’s favorite but they really pull their weight in the garden. I just got my beet seeds in the ground. Soon, those red and green leaves will be popping up through the soil. Thank you for looking into growing better beets this week. Don’t forget to subscribe in the sidebar and you won’t miss out on helpful weekly gardening posts.

Hilary|Everlongardener

1 thought on “Growing Better Beets”

  1. I love beets. I tried the 3 Root Grex beets last year, but only seemed to get the yellow ones. Maybe I unwittingly favored them when I was thinning for some reason.

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